Tentative Agenda for June 2015 Peer Convening

Wednesday, June 24 | DAY 1

11:00-1:00pm      Special Session for California Cities (Location: Sandringham/Windsor)

2:00-3:00 pm       Registration, refreshments, and networking (Foyer)

3:00-3:30 pm       Opening Remarks (Grand Ballroom)

                David Eichenthal, Executive Director, National Resource Network

                Danny Alfonso, City Manager, City of Miami

3:30-4:15 pm       Meeting the Cities Pt. I (Grand Ballroom)

  • Baltimore, MD

  • Memphis, TN

  • Atlanta, GA

  • Dallas, TX

  • Peoria, IL

  • Dearborn, MI

  • East Providence, RI

  • Passaic, NJ

  • Perth Amboy, NJ

4:15-5:30 pm       Working sessions #1

National Resource Network 101 (Cambridge)

Not sure what the National Resource Network actually does? Learn more about the initiative’s goal and approach, and how you can get the most out of being a part of it.

Capacity Building Inside and Outside of City Hall (Balmoral)

What role can partnerships play in making local government more effective? How can city leaders develop their existing staff to empower them to do more, lead better, etc.?

Bridging the Job/Skill Mismatch (Escorial/Alhambra)

How can cities connect the education and training offered to their residents with the jobs currently available? Alternatively, how can cities attract jobs that match the current skills of residents?

Stabilizing Neighborhoods in a Post-NSP World (Sandrigham)

What new resources are available to maintain capacity and finance initiatives for neighborhood stabilization? How can cities pivot from one-off efforts to begin to think about comprehensive, sustainable neighborhood stabilization?

Attracting Investment to Maximize your Vacant Properties (Raphael/Michelangelo)

How can cities encourage private sector investment in brownfields and other vacant properties? How do you know if you are maximizing the potential for redevelopment of these spaces? What are the best places to turn to for federal, state, or other financing? 

5:30-6:15 pm       Huddle #1 with Companion Teams (find a space of your choosing)

6:15-7:00 pm       Break

7:00-9:00 pm       Dinner (Grand Ballroom)

 

Thursday, June 25 | DAY 2

7:30-8:00 am       Coffee and breakfast (Foyer)

8:00-8:20 am       Welcome and Remarks (Grand Ballroom)

David Eichenthal, Executive Director, National Resource Network

Victoria Collin, Senior Policy Analyst, Office of Management and Budget

8:20-9:30 am       Meeting the Cities Pt. II 

  • Providence, RI

  • Hartford, CT

  • Chattanooga, TN

  • Macon, GA

  • Winston-Salem, NC

  • Greensboro, NC

  • Danville, VA

  • Brownsville, TX

  • Springfield, MO

  • Waco, TX

  • Hattiesburg, MS

9:30-11:30am      Tour of Miami – Wynwood Neighborhood

The Wynwood Walls was conceived by the renowned community revitalizer and placemaker, the late Tony Goldman in 2009. He was looking for something big to transform the warehouse district of Wynwood, and he arrived at a simple idea: "Wynwood's large stock of warehouse buildings, all with no windows, would be my giant canvases to bring to them the greatest street art ever seen in one place." Starting with the 25th–26th Street complex of six separate buildings, his goal was to create a center where people could gravitate to and explore, and to develop the area's pedestrian potential.

The Wynwood Walls became a major art statement with Tony's commitment to graffiti and street art, a genre that he believed was under appreciated and not respected historically. He wanted togive the movement more attention and more respect: "By presenting it in a way that has not been done before, I was able to expose the public to something they had only seen peripherally." In 2010, building on the momentum of the year before, Goldman Properties added 10 more artists to their roster of Walls. They opened the Wynwood Doors, Tony Goldman’s nod to traditional portrait galleries and expanded the mural program outside the Walls.

Since its inception, the Wynwood Walls program has seen over 50 artists representing 16 countries and have covered over 80,000 square feet of walls.

 

11:30-12:00 pm   Break

12:00-1:00 pm     Huddle #2 with Companion Teams over Lunch

1:00-2:15 pm       Working Sessions #2 

Partnering with Anchor Institutions for Economic Opportunity (Balmoral)

How can hospitals, universities and other anchor institutions promote growth, employment and economic opportunity?

Engaging Citizens in Your Community’s Future (Trianon)

What are effective strategies to acquire and retain diverse, effective community participation in your city’s short-term efforts and long-term planning? How can you create effective community buy-in for systems change? How can citizen data be effectively used to inform city decisions?

Community Safety and Community Trust (Escorial/Alhambra)

How do you know if you really have a crime problem? What are proven, effective strategies to begin addressing the issue? How can cities help promote community safety and protect civil rights?

New Models for Effective Service Delivery (Sandrigham)

How can understanding the difference between capacity and utilization, whether in fire departments, libraries, or buses, help improve service delivery? What is the role of interagency collaboration in improving service delivery? How can city leaders effectively lead this effort? 

Building on Small Wins in Downtown Redevelopment (Raphael/Michelangelo)

What are simple, cost-efficient tactics for spurring downtown development? How can cities leverage “green sprouts” and expand on early wins to create housing and commercial opportunities? How can cities improve relationships with existing business to encourage them to stay and, perhaps, expand their presence?

2:15-2:30 pm   Break

2:30-3:45 pm   Working Sessions #3

Bridging the Job/Skill Mismatch (Balmoral)

How can cities connect the education and training offered to their residents with the jobs currently available? Alternatively, how can cities attract jobs that match the current skills of residents?

Attracting Investment to Maximize Your Vacant Properties (Sandrigham)

How can cities encourage private sector investment in brownfields and other vacant properties? How do you know if you are maximizing the potential for redevelopment of these spaces? What are the best places to turn to for federal, state, or other financing? 

(Re)Financing Options for Long-Standing Programs and New Initiatives (Escorial/Alhambra)

What are proven strategies for aligning priorities with funding and planning for the future? How can distressed communities stretch their budgets? With aging infrastructure and shrinking budgets, how can cities get creative in how they fund necessary infrastructure improvements? 

Building Better Partnerships with Federal and State Governments (Trianon)

What’s working from the federal and state governments in your cities? What are some of the biggest roadblocks in effective partnership between the levels of government? What changes would make the biggest difference?

Sustainable Development in Distressed Communities (Raphael/Michelangelo)

While focusing primarily on economic development, how can cities stay committed to social equity and environmental integrity in their redevelopment efforts? With limited dollars and competing interests, what are some low-cost or no-cost strategies for creating a more sustainable city? 

3:45-4:45 pm   Huddle #3 with Companion Teams

6:00-8:00 pm   Reception (Grand Ballroom)

 

Friday, June 26 | DAY 3

7:30-8:00 am       Coffee and breakfast

8:00-8:20 am       Welcome and Remarks (Grand Ballroom)

David Eichenthal, Executive Director, National Resource Network

Patrick Pontius, Executive Director, White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities (SC2)

8:20-9:30 am   Meeting the Cities Pt. III

  • Fort Myers, FL

  • Ocala, FL

  • Pompano Beach, FL

  • Miami Gardens, FL

  • North Miami, FL

  • North Miami Beach, FL

  • Gonzales, Soledad & Salinas, CA (regional)

  • Yuba City, CA

  • Lancaster, CA

  • North Las Vegas, NV

  • Richmond, CA

  • Stockton, CA

9:30-11:30am   Tour of Miami #2

Overtown is a historically African-American community in the City of Miami. As Miami was developing around 1910, the city’s black residents were allowed to purchase land only in one designated quarter of Miami’s municipal limits, which became known as Colored Town. The name Overtown came from people referring that they were going “over town” to this neighborhood. Overtown is one of Miami’s original neighborhoods and the early 20th Century saw the quick rise of churches, restaurants, residences, nightclubs and theaters. Today, the total population of Overtown is approximately 9,000 persons and is predominately African American (74%). Overtown is now on the threshold of becoming a destination of choice for South Florida residents. During the next few years, approximately 2,000 housing units will be built in the neighborhood and the Overtown renaissance will continue to strengthen existing businesses and institutions with careful attention to its history and culture.

11:30-12:00 pm  Break

12:00-1:00 pm     Huddle #4 with Companion Teams over Lunch

1:00-2:15 pm       Working Sessions #4

Connecting Residents to Jobs with Transportation Options (Balmoral)

What role does public transportation play in connecting residents with appropriately skilled jobs nearby? Are there advantages of fixed route vs. bus rapid transit to serve working population?

Partnering with Anchor Institutions for Economic Opportunity (Dupont)

How can hospitals, universities and other anchor institutions promote growth, employment and economic opportunity?

Improving Your Local School System (Raphael/Michelangelo)

Strong educational systems matter, both for appropriately training residents for the workforce and attracting new businesses and employees. What can cities do to improve public schools if they run or fund them? What can cities do to improve public schools if they don’t run or fund them? 

Building on the Small Wins in Downtown Revitalization (Escorial/Alhambra)

What are simple, cost-efficient tactics for spurring downtown development? How can cities leverage “green sprouts” and expand on early wins to create housing and commercial opportunities? How can cities improve relationships with existing business to encourage them to stay and, perhaps, expand their presence?

Creating Healthy Communities (Tuttle)

What are the new models for creating healthy neighborhoods? How can cities leverage community development and housing investments to improve health outcomes and quality of life?

2:15-2:45 pm       Wrap Up and Next Steps

3:00-4:30 pm       Special Session for Florida Cities (Gusman: lobby level, past Starbucks & Toro Toro)